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Overview: Articles

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Image: Graphic of a brain; Copyright:

Imaging technique maps serotonin activity in living brains


Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that's partly responsible for feelings of happiness and for mood regulation in humans. This makes it a common target for antidepressants, which block serotonin from being reabsorbed by neurons after it has dispatched its signal, so more of it stays floating around the brain.
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Image: Graphic of a nano tubes; Copyright:

Tiny gold particles could be the key to developing a treatment for pancreatic cancer


A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is often a death sentence because chemotherapy and radiation have little impact on the disease. In the U.S. this year, some 53,000 new cases will be diagnosed, and 42,000 patients will die of the disease. But research now being reported in ACS Nano could eventually lead to a new type of treatment based on gold nanoparticles.
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Image: Graphic of a smartphone; Copyright: Washington State University

WSU portable smartphone laboratory detects cancer


Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a smartphone that can analyze several samples at once to catch a cancer biomarker, producing lab quality results.
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Photo: Nano-wire sensor in the middle of a two-dimensional force field, starting from a yellow object in the foreground; Copyright: University of Basel

Nanowires as sensors in new type of atomic force microscope


A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) uses nanowires as tiny sensors. Unlike standard AFM, the device with a nanowire sensor enables measurements of both the size and direction of forces.
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Photo:  image of a sealed glass cell; Copyright: University of Virginia

Scientists create novel imaging technique with potential for medical diagnostics


A new imaging method, called "polarized nuclear imaging" - combining aspects of both magnetic resonance imaging and gamma-ray imaging - has potential for new types of high-resolution medical diagnostics as well as industrial and physics research applications.
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Photo: Belt for Rehabilitation; Copyright: Mard Delachaux / EPFL2016

Soft robots that mimic human muscles


Robots are usually expected to be rigid, fast and efficient. But researchers at EPFL's Reconfigurable Robotics Lab (RRL) have turned that notion on its head with their soft robots.
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Image: graphic of integrated intensity of YHO-7 110 diffraction peak as a function of temperature; Copyright: Tokyo Institute of Technology

Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics


'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory.
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Image: multiple coordinated views of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Copyright: Sugeerth Murugesan, Berkeley Lab/UC Davis

Brain modulyzer provides interactive window into the brain


New Berkeley Lab tool could shed light on how neurological diseases spread.
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Image: Illustration of cancer cells; Copyright:

Using nanotechnology to target inoperable tumors


Many solid tumors are considered inoperable because they adhere to vital structures or the surgery would cause irreversible damages to the patients. In order to prevent the tumor growth or provide complete tumor resolution without surgery, chemotherapy and radiation are currently in clinical practice.
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Image: Illustration of how the contact lens works; Copyright: University of Houston

Invention of glucose-sensing contact lens


Blood testing is the standard option for checking glucose levels, but a new technology could allow non-invasive testing via a contact lens that samples glucose levels in tears.
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