COMPAMED Newsletter

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Image: Collage of three images showing bacteria in the blood amd how magnetic dialysis could work; Copyright: EMPA

"Pulling" bacteria out of blood

21/12/2016

Blood poisoning is still fatal in more than 50 percent of cases, but can be cured if treated at an early stage. The highest priority is therefore to act quickly. For this reason, doctors usually administer antibiotics even in the event of a suspicion of blood poisoning, without first ascertaining whether it is actually a bacterial sepsis.
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Photo: Dr. Surjo R. Soekadar (left) with a propositi; Copyright: Surjo R. Soekadar

Neurorobotic hand exoskeleton restores grasp function to quadriplegics

15/12/2016

A consortium of European scientists has successfully restored grasp function to six quadriplegics using a non-invasive hybrid brain-neural hand exoskeleton. The system was developed by researchers at the University of Tübingen, Germany, The BioRobotics Institute at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy, and the Guttmann Institute in Spain.
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Image: Microscopic image of nanostructures; Copyright: Brelon J. May/Ohio State University

New LEDs may offer better way to clean water in remote areas

25/11/2016

For the first time, researchers have created light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on lightweight flexible metal foil. Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing the foil based LEDs for portable ultraviolet (UV) lights that soldiers and others can use to purify drinking water and sterilize medical equipment.
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Image: Researcher is holding a star shaped object in his hand; Copyright: Melanie Gonick/MIT

New capsule achieves long-term drug delivery

24/11/2016

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new drug capsule that remains in the stomach for up to two weeks after being swallowed, gradually releasing its drug payload.
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Image: Two men in a laboratory; Copyright: UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering

'Exceptional' nanosensor architecture based on exceptional points

15/11/2016

Researchers from the University of California San Diego have developed a novel design for a compact, ultra-sensitive nanosensor that can be used to make portable health-monitoring devices and to detect minute quantities of toxins and explosives for security applications.
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Image: Graphic of a huge atom on a scale and a bulb; Copyright: NanoPhotonics Cambridge/Bart deNijs

World's smallest magnifying glass

11/11/2016

For centuries, scientists believed that light, like all waves, couldn't be focused down smaller than its wavelength, just under a millionth of a metre. Now, researchers led by the University of Cambridge have created the world's smallest magnifying glass.
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Photo: Graphic for Deep Text Comprehension; Copyright: ORNL

Accelerating cancer research with deep learning

10/11/2016

Despite steady progress in detection and treatment in recent decades, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, cutting short the lives of approximately 500,000 people each year.
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Image: Hand is holding a plastic frame with golden membranes inside; Copyright: DGIST

Brand-new cochlear implant technology born from frictional electricity

25/10/2016

DGIST Professor Hongsoo Choi (Department of Robotics Engineering) and his research team developed the world's first artificial basilar membrane that mimics the cochlear function by application of the genetic principle of frictional electricity.
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Image: Graphic of a brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexmit

Imaging technique maps serotonin activity in living brains

21/10/2016

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that's partly responsible for feelings of happiness and for mood regulation in humans. This makes it a common target for antidepressants, which block serotonin from being reabsorbed by neurons after it has dispatched its signal, so more of it stays floating around the brain.
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