COMPAMED Newsletter

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Image: Microscopic image of nanostructures; Copyright: Brelon J. May/Ohio State University

New LEDs may offer better way to clean water in remote areas

25/11/2016

For the first time, researchers have created light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on lightweight flexible metal foil. Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing the foil based LEDs for portable ultraviolet (UV) lights that soldiers and others can use to purify drinking water and sterilize medical equipment.
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Image: Researcher is holding a star shaped object in his hand; Copyright: Melanie Gonick/MIT

New capsule achieves long-term drug delivery

24/11/2016

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new drug capsule that remains in the stomach for up to two weeks after being swallowed, gradually releasing its drug payload.
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Image: Two men in a laboratory; Copyright: UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering

'Exceptional' nanosensor architecture based on exceptional points

15/11/2016

Researchers from the University of California San Diego have developed a novel design for a compact, ultra-sensitive nanosensor that can be used to make portable health-monitoring devices and to detect minute quantities of toxins and explosives for security applications.
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Image: Graphic of a huge atom on a scale and a bulb; Copyright: NanoPhotonics Cambridge/Bart deNijs

World's smallest magnifying glass

11/11/2016

For centuries, scientists believed that light, like all waves, couldn't be focused down smaller than its wavelength, just under a millionth of a metre. Now, researchers led by the University of Cambridge have created the world's smallest magnifying glass.
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Photo: Graphic for Deep Text Comprehension; Copyright: ORNL

Accelerating cancer research with deep learning

10/11/2016

Despite steady progress in detection and treatment in recent decades, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, cutting short the lives of approximately 500,000 people each year.
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Image: Hand is holding a plastic frame with golden membranes inside; Copyright: DGIST

Brand-new cochlear implant technology born from frictional electricity

25/10/2016

DGIST Professor Hongsoo Choi (Department of Robotics Engineering) and his research team developed the world's first artificial basilar membrane that mimics the cochlear function by application of the genetic principle of frictional electricity.
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Image: Graphic of a brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexmit

Imaging technique maps serotonin activity in living brains

21/10/2016

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that's partly responsible for feelings of happiness and for mood regulation in humans. This makes it a common target for antidepressants, which block serotonin from being reabsorbed by neurons after it has dispatched its signal, so more of it stays floating around the brain.
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Photo:  image of a sealed glass cell; Copyright: University of Virginia

Scientists create novel imaging technique with potential for medical diagnostics

14/10/2016

A new imaging method, called "polarized nuclear imaging" - combining aspects of both magnetic resonance imaging and gamma-ray imaging - has potential for new types of high-resolution medical diagnostics as well as industrial and physics research applications.
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Image: multiple coordinated views of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Copyright: Sugeerth Murugesan, Berkeley Lab/UC Davis

Brain modulyzer provides interactive window into the brain

11/10/2016

New Berkeley Lab tool could shed light on how neurological diseases spread.
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Image: DNA strand with repeated DNA codes in the foreground; Copyright: NHGRI

DNA repeat stretches tied to cancer progression and survival

04/10/2016

Short, unstable stretches of DNA, called microsatellites, may play a far greater role in the development and progression of cancer than previously thought.
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Image: man sitting on his desktop, smiling; Copyright: L.A. Cicero

Brain-sensing technology allows typing at 12 words per minute

30/09/2016

A technology for reading signals directly from the brain developed by Stanford Bio-X scientists could provide a way for people with movement disabilities to communicate.
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Image: Schematic image of a cell; Copyright: KAUST

Self-assembled nanostructures hit their target

28/09/2016

A biocompatible nanomaterial that can be controlled with light finds a use in gene delivery.
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Image: Graphic showing a model of the human heart and ECG curves; Copyright: Tobias Brügmann (University Bonn)/Patrick M. Boyle (John Hopkins University)

Termination of lethal arrhythmia with light

22/09/2016

A research team from the University of Bonn has succeeded for the first time in using light stimuli to stop life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia in mouse hearts. Furthermore, as shown in computer simulations at Johns Hopkins University, this technique could also be used successfully for human hearts.
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Image: Image shows a 3D bone scan ; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/dimdimich

Chemists devise revolutionary 3-D bone-scanning technique

09/09/2016

Chemists from Trinity College Dublin, in collaboration with RCSI, have devised a revolutionary new scanning technique that produces extremely high-res 3D images of bones -- without exposing patients to X-ray radiation.
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Image: Image shows ion accelerator using a lser; Copyright: Felix Mackenroth

A new way of taming ions can improve future health care

08/09/2016

A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology has discovered a completely new way of using lasers to accelerate ion beams. In time, the new technique could possibly give more people access to advanced cancer treatment.
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Image: Small bottle with graphene; Copyright: Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University

Engineers treat printed graphene with lasers to enable paper electronics

02/09/2016

The researchers in Jonathan Claussen's lab at Iowa State University have been looking for ways to use graphene and its amazing properties in their sensors and other technologies.
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Image: Software screenshot; Copyright: Eugene Wu

A data-cleaning tool for building better prediction models

31/08/2016

Big data sets are full of dirty data, and these outliers, typos and missing values can produce distorted models that lead to wrong conclusions and bad decisions, be it in healthcare or finance. With so much at stake, data cleaning should be easier.
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