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Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick
Wearable sensors that monitor heart rate, activity, skin temperature and other variables can reveal a lot about what is going on inside a person, including the onset of infection, inflammation and even insulin resistance, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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Deciphering the beetle exoskeleton with nanomechanics
What can a beetle tell us about good design principles? Quite a lot, actually. Many insects and crustaceans possess hard, armor-like exoskeletons that, in theory, should weigh the creatures down. But, instead, the exoskeletons are surprisingly light. Northwestern Engineering's Horacio D. Espinosa and his group are working to understand the underlying design principles and mechanical properties.
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Study finds postdoc jobs in biomedicine don't yield positive returns in the labor market
A new study by Boston University Questrom School of Business and University of Kansas researchers has found that postdoc jobs don't yield a positive return in the labor market, and that these positions likely cost graduates roughly three years' worth of salary in their first 15 years of their careers.
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Chance meeting leads to creation of antibiotic spider silk
An interdisciplinary team of scientists at The University of Nottingham has developed a technique to produce chemically functionalized spider silk that can be tailored to applications used in drug delivery, regenerative medicine and wound healing.
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Manufacturing platform makes intricate biocompatible micromachines
A team of researchers led by Biomedical Engineering Professor Sam Sia has developed a way to manufacture microscale-sized machines from biomaterials that can safely be implanted in the body. Working with hydrogels, which are biocompatible materials that engineers have been studying for decades, Sia has invented a new technique.
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Evolving deep brain stimulation patterns
Duke University biomedical engineers have used computers to "evolve" more effective patterns of electric shocks delivered deep within the brain to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms.
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A closer look at the eye
Researchers have developed a new imaging technique that could revolutionize how eye health and disease are assessed. The group is first to be able to make out individual cells at the back of the eye that are implicated in vision loss in diseases like glaucoma. They hope their new technique could prevent vision loss via earlier diagnosis and treatment for these diseases.
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Nanohyperthermia softens tumors to improve treatment
The mechanical resistance of tumors and collateral damage of standard treatments often hinder efforts to defeat cancers. However, a team of researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Paris Descartes University, and Paris Diderot University has successfully softened malignant tumors by heating them.
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New weapon against Diabetes
ETH Researchers have used the simplest approach yet to produce artificial beta cells from human kidney cells. Like their natural model, the artificial cells act as both sugar sensors and insulin producers.
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"Pulling" bacteria out of blood
Blood poisoning is still fatal in more than 50 percent of cases, but can be cured if treated at an early stage. The highest priority is therefore to act quickly. For this reason, doctors usually administer antibiotics even in the event of a suspicion of blood poisoning, without first ascertaining whether it is actually a bacterial sepsis.
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