Scientists Uncoil DNA Wires for Future Devices

Photo: Four fluorescent DNA strand patterns

Postdoctoral researcher Jingjiao Guan and L. James Lee, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Ohio State University, describe in their paper how they used a tiny rubber comb to pull DNA strands from drops of water and stamp them onto glass chips.

Other labs have formed very simple structures with DNA, and those are now used in devices for gene testing and medical diagnostics. But Lee and Guan say they are the first to coax strands of DNA into structures that are at once so orderly and so complex that they resemble stitches on a quilt.

“These are very narrow, very long wires that can be designed into patterns for molecular electronics or biosensors,” Lee said. “And in our case, we want to try to build tools for gene delivery, DNA recombination, and maybe even gene repair, down the road.” The longest strands are one millimeter long, and only one nanometer thick. On a larger scale, positioning such a long, skinny tendril of DNA is like wielding a human hair that is ten meters long. Yet Lee and Guan are able to arrange their DNA strands with nanometer precision, using relatively simple equipment.

In this patent-pending technology, the researchers press the comb into a drop of water containing coils of DNA molecules. Some of the DNA strands fall between the comb’s teeth, so that the strands uncoil and stretch out along the surface of the comb as it is pulled from the water. They then place the comb on a glass chip surface. Depending on how they place the comb, they leave behind strands of different lengths and shapes.

Computer chips that bridge the gap between the electronic and the biological could make detection of certain chemicals easier, and speed disease diagnosis. But first, researchers must develop technologies to mass produce DNA circuits as they produce chip circuits today.; Source: Ohio State University