Newsletter of COMPAMED | View in browser | Deutsch | Print
Image: Header picture of COMPAMED Newsletter

No chance for microbes

Dear Sir or Madam,

In the cold season I often see people trying to open doors with their long-sleeve over their hands or with an elbow. Certainly not the most elegant way to avoid skin contact with potential microbes on door handles, but quite effective. Unfortunately, this technique does not work for patients and hospital staff. For this reason, researchers work on new surface coatings on which viruses and bacteria have no chance of survival. How they work and where to find them you can read in our current Special.

Have fun reading,

Simone Ernst
Editorial team COMPAMED-tradefair.com

PS: If you are interested in 3D printing, then take a look at our latest video. Production and material selection are explained here!

Content

Special: Coatings against microbes
Video: 3D-printed medical devices
Newsletter Service
Newsletter Archive
RSS Service

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Engineers develop wearable respiration monitor with children's toy

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a wearable, disposable respiration monitor that provides high-fidelity readings on a continuous basis.
read more
To top

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Advances in stretchable semiconductors

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported significant advances in stretchable electronics, moving the field closer to commercialization. They outlined advances in creating stretchable rubbery semiconductors, including rubbery integrated electronics, logic circuits and arrayed sensory skins fully based on rubber materials.
read more
To top

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

New 3D nanoprinting strategy: revolution in medicine

Engineers at the University of Maryland (UMD) demonstrate their approach by printing the smallest-known 3D microfluidic circuit element.
read more
To top

Hygiene: coatings against microbes

Special

Image: Hospital corridor in the operating room, with doctors dressed in green in the background;; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vilevi
They are everywhere: microbes. Many of them are useful. Others can make us sick. Especially in hospitals, old people's homes and medical practices, they can pose a danger through transmission. For example, when an immunocompromised patient comes into contact with MRSA. Special coatings could help.
Read more in our current Special!
Hygiene: coatings against microbes
To top

Materials & Production

Laser-induced graphene gets tough

Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites.
read more
To top

Materials & Production

Blockchain: security and traceability for smart manufacturing

Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) needed a way to secure smart manufacturing systems using the digital thread , so they turned to the new kid on the block ... blockchain, that is.
read more
To top

Materials & Production

Antireflection coating makes plastic invisible

Antireflection (AR) coatings on plastics have a multitude of practical applications, including glare reduction on eyeglasses, computer monitors and the display on your smart-phone when outdoors. Now, researchers at Penn State have developed an AR coating that improves on existing coatings to the extent that it can make transparent plastics, such as Plexiglas, virtually invisible.
read more
To top

3D-printed medical devices

Video

Photo: Preview picture of the video
Medical technology devices are produced throughout the world. 3D printing has proven to be the most efficient technique for this endeavor. Aside from fast and cost-effective production, medical devices must expressly meet the highest quality standards. At igus GmbH, we gained insights into 3D printer manufacturing and material selection and learned how the products are being tested in the laboratory.
Click here for the video!
From work order to highly precise manufacturing - 3D-printed medical devices
All videos in the MediaCenter
To top

Innovations

Getting a grip on human-robot cooperation

New study reveals guiding principles that regulate choice of grasp type during a human-robot exchange of objects.
read more
To top

Innovations

Invisible tags

A team of physicists headed by Prof. Sebastian Reineke of TU Dresden developed a new method of storing information in fully transparent plastic foils. Their innovative idea was now published in the online journal "Science Advances".
read more
To top

Mechanical & Process Engineering

Making ultrafast lasers faster

Lasers with ultrashort pulses in the picosecond and femtosecond range are referred to as ultrafast lasers. They are known for their ultra-precise ablation and cutting results. Unfortunately, processing with such lasers takes time. To address this issue, a new research project, funded by the European Commission, aims to make material processing with ultrafast lasers up to a hundred times faster.
read more
To top

Newsletter Service

You like our newsletter? Then please recommend us: Forward this newsletter or the link www.COMPAMED.de/news_abo_2 to your friends and colleagues.

If you have difficulties with your order, please write an e-mail to redaktion@compamed.de.

To top
Legal disclaimer

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz, Stockumer Kirchstr. 61
40474 Düsseldorf, Germany

Phone: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
www.messe-duesseldorf.de
info@messe-duesseldorf.de

County Court Düsseldorf HRB 63

Board of Managing Directors: Werner M. Dornscheidt (Chairman), Hans Werner Reinhard, Wolfram N. Diener, Bernhard Stempfle

Chairman of Supervisory Board: Mayor Thomas Geisel

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH processes your personal data. The data protection regulations of Messe Düsseldorf GmbH hold information in closer detail to this subject and are available under www.messe-duesseldorf.de/privacy. You may at any time object to the processing of your personal data either on the aforementioned website, via e-mail to privacy@messe-duesseldorf.de or via postal mail to Messe Düsseldorf GmbH, VG-R, PF 101006, 40001 Düsseldorf, Germany.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube

Should you no longer wish to receive our newsletter, please click here.