COMPAMED Newsletter

Graphic of an envelope with stroke "Order now!"

Image: Graphic in blue and black - Domain Walls; Copyright: Queen's University Belfast

Breakthrough by Queen's University paves way for smaller electronic devices

16/06/2017

Queen's University Belfast researchers have discovered a new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets, which could revolutionise the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology.
Read more
Image: Peptide Nanofibers; Copyright: Hartgerink Research Group/Rice University

Mussels add muscle to biocompatible fibers

15/06/2017

Rice University chemists develop hydrogel strings using compound found in sea creatures.
Read more
Image: A colony of bacillar bacteria forming a biofilm; Copyright: Vernita Gordon/U. of Texas at Austin

Biofilm discovery suggests way to prevent infections

01/06/2017

Microbial biofilms - dense, sticky mats of bacteria that are hard to treat and can lead to dangerous infections - often form in medical equipment, such as flexible plastic tubing used in catheters or in tubes used to help patients breathe. By some estimates, more than 1 million people contract infections from medical devices in U.S. hospitals each year, many of which are due to biofilms.
Read more
Image: old man with no hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Tawatchai Khid-arn

Hand that sees offers new hope to amputees

05/05/2017

A new generation of prosthetic limbs which will allow the wearer to reach for objects automatically, without thinking -- just like a real hand -- are to be trialled for the first time.
Read more
Image: Medical glass vials in a production line; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Serhii Nernamov

Tiny 'cages' could keep vaccines safe at high temperatures

28/04/2017

Vaccines and antibodies could be transported and stored without refrigeration by capturing them in tiny silica 'cages', a discovery which could make getting vital medicines to remote or dangerous places much easier, cheaper and safer.
Read more
Image: A preemie in an incubator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ondrooo

Lab on a chip designed to minimize preterm births

25/04/2017

In the United States alone, a half million babies are born preterm; worldwide, the number is an estimated 15 million. Complications associated with preterm birth are the no. 1 cause of death for children under 5, and those who live often face a range of health problems.
Read more
Image: Two scientists look at a screen which shows red and green dots; Copyright: J. Hillmer, DWI

An injectable guidance system for nerve cells

11/04/2017

In many tissues of the human body, such as nerve tissue, the spatial organization of cells plays an important role. Nerve cells and their long protrusions assemble into nerve tracts and transport information throughout the body. When such a tissue is injured, an accurate spatial orientation of the cells facilitates the healing process.
Read more
Image: a cell structure in blue; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ralwel

How to hack a cell

05/04/2017

The human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave by converting their genes into programmable circuits.
Read more
Image: A black and white radiographic image of a nozzle; Copyright: Dominik Oberthür, DESY

Novel nozzle saves crystals

23/03/2017

Scientists are interested in the spatial structure of proteins, as it reveals much about the workings of these biomolecules. This knowledge can lead to a better understanding of the functions of biomolecules and to tailored medicines. X-ray crystallography is the prime tool to solve protein structures. However, it requires to grow crystals of the proteins under investigation.
Read more
Image: A cell clinging to an uneven surface; Copyright: UC San Diego

New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

21/03/2017

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light.
Read more