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Silk 'micrococoons' could be used in biotechnology and medicine
Microscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms have been manufactured by a team of researchers. The tiny capsules, which are invisible to the naked eye, can protect sensitive molecular materials, and could prove a significant technology in areas including food science, biotechnology and medicine.
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Innovative nanosensor for disease diagnosis
Breath pattern recognition is a futuristic diagnostic platform. Simple characterizing target gas concentrations of human exhaled breath will lead to diagnose of the disease as well as physical condition.
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Powerful new technique can clone thousands of genes at once
Scientists at Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, the University of Trento in Italy, and Harvard Medical School report they have developed a new molecular technique called LASSO cloning, which can be used to isolate thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time, more than ever before possible.
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A new ligand extends the half-life of peptide drugs from minutes to days
Peptides are biological molecules, made up of short sequences of amino acids. Because they are easy to synthesize, show low toxicity and high efficiency, peptides such as insulin and other hormones can be used as drugs. On the other hand, they are quickly cleared by the kidneys. This problem can be overcome by connecting peptides to ligands.
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Mapping genes could improve cancer diagnosis
Large-scale changes to the structure of the genome are often seen in cancer cells. Scientists at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, UK, have found a way to detect these changes, which could enhance cancer diagnosis and aid the use of targeted treatments.
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Multi-antioxidant nanoparticles to treat sepsis
With an incidence of 31.5 million worldwide and a mortality of around 17%, sepsis remains the most common cause of death in hospitalized patients, even in industrialized countries where antibiotics and critical care facilities are readily available. While this disease begins as a serious infection, sepsis' life-threatening organ failure is due to an excessive inflammatory response.
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3-D bioprinting: One step closer to growing capillaries
In their work toward 3-D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries.
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A new molecular scissors act like a GPS to improve genome editing
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), led by the Spanish researcher Guillermo Montoya, have discovered how Cpf1, a new molecular scissors unzip and cleave DNA. This member of the CRISPR-Cas family displays a high accuracy, capable of acting like a GPS in order to identify its destination within the intricate map of the genome.
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Guardian of the genome: Structure of key enzyme decoded
Scientists from the University of Würzburg solved the structure of the human protein RecQ4 and gained insights into its unusual functional mechanisms, which could help towards the development of new therapeutic strategies against certain tumors.
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Optics meets genetic engineering: Innovation Forum Optogenetics has started
Which potentials does the field of optogenetics offer? What are the future business fields and sales markets? The Innovation Network Optogenetics, which started in June, is out to answer these questions. A two-day session on November 28th and 29th, 2017, in Hannover, will bring together stakeholders from different technology areas, in order to bundle competencies and to create synergy.
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