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Illustration:a human arm, a sensor on it and a mobile; Copyright:  Cheng Lab/Penn State

Wearable: gas sensor for health and environmental monitoring

17.01.2020

A highly sensitive, wearable gas sensor for environmental and human health monitoring may soon become commercially available, according to researchers at Penn State and Northeastern University.
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Illustration: a human hand  and a robot hand with a glucose messing system; Copyright:  PantherMedia / Andriy Popov

Designing better nursing care with robots

16.01.2020

Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan. To help improve the safety and efficacy of robotic care, the scientists have developed a control method that could help robots better replicate human movement when lifting and moving a patient. They published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica.
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Illustration: a hand, electronic and flashes; Copyright: T.-Cossa Lab, Department of Physics, University of Ottawa

A tool to democratize nanopore research

15.01.2020

A nanopore is a tiny hole in a thin membrane with a diameter of around a billionth of a meter, or about the width of a single DNA molecule. The potential applications of these nanopores are so diverse - from medicine to information technology (IT) - that they could have a major impact on our daily lives.
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Illustration: Perfusion Machine in a hospital room; Copyright: USZ

Machine keeps human livers alive

14.01.2020

Researchers from the University Hospital Zurich, ETH Zurich, Wyss Zurich and the University of Zurich have developed a machine that repairs injured human livers and keeps them alive outside the body for one week. This breakthrough may increase the number of available organs for transplantation saving many lives of patients with severe liver diseases or cancer.
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Illustration: a blue sign

Machine learning shapes microwaves for a computer's eyes

10.01.2020

Engineers from Duke University and the Institut de Physique de Nice in France have developed a new method to identify objects using microwaves that improves accuracy while reducing the associated computing time and power requirements.
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Image: Excitation of helium nanodroplets by ultra-short laser pulses; Copyright: AG Stienkemeier

Ultrafast reaction of superfluid helium triggerd by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses

09.01.2020

A team headed by Professor Frank Stienkemeier at Freiburg’s Institute of Physics and Dr. Marcel Mudrich, professor at the University of Aarhus in Denmark, has observed the ultrafast reaction of nanodroplets of helium after excitation with extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) using a free-electron laser in real time.
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Illustration: Comparison of single walled carbon nanotubes; Copyright: Energy Safety Research Institute, Swansea University

New production method for carbon nanotubes

08.01.2020

A new method of producing carbon nanotubes - tiny molecules with incredible physical properties used in touchscreen displays, 5G networks and flexible electronics - has been given the green light by researchers, meaning work in this crucial field can continue.
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Illustration: architecture of TruST, a robotic device that retrains patients with spinal cord injury to sit more stably; Copyright: Sunil Agrawal and Victor Santamaria/Columbia Engineering

Robotic trunk support assists those with spinal cord injury

07.01.2020

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can cause devastating damage, including loss of mobility and sensation. Every year, there are an estimated 17,000 new SCIs in the US alone, a rate higher than in most regions of the world. In addition, the rate of SCIs in people 65-years or older is expected to rise in the US, from 13.0 percent in 2010 to 16.1 percent by 2020.
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Picture: Smiling man with glasses and beard; Copyright: Konrad Gös

Research: Men are more likely than women to call their science "excellent"

20.12.2019

Male scientists more likely than female colleagues to use language framing their research findings as "excellent", "novel" and "unique". These are the findings of an analysis led by an international team of researchers at the University of Mannheim, the Harvard Medical School, and Yale University, published Dec. 16 in BMJ.
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Image: a supercomputer in Japan; Copyright: RIKEN

AI: identifies unknown features associated with cancer recurrence

19.12.2019

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology developed by the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP) in Japan has successfully found features in pathology images from human cancer patients, without annotation, that could be understood by human doctors.
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