Newsletter of COMPAMED | View in browser | Deutsch | Print
Image: Header picture of COMPAMED Newsletter

Quantum and medical technology

Dear Sir or Madam,

Almost everyone has ever heard of quantum technologies and quantum particles. However, only a few can really have a say in this topic. But even if the topic is complex and not easy to understand - it affects more and more areas of our life. Medical technology should also benefit from quantum technology in the future. How, you will find out in our current interview!

Have a good start into the week!

Simone Ernst
Editorial team COMPAMED-tradefair.com

Content

Special: Medical device packaging systems
Interview: Quantum technology
Newsletter Service
Newsletter Archive
RSS Service

Microtechnology: pill-sized camera for endoscopy

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Greater resolution, sharper images, and more efficient diagnostic processes – this is the promise of an endoscopy capsule developed by Fraunhofer IZM to allow more detailed small intestine diagnostics.
read more
To top

Micro manufacturing: the world's smallest stent

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Approximately one in every thousand children develops a urethral stricture, sometimes even when they are still a foetus in the womb.
read more
To top

Quantum technology transforms industry and technology

COMPAMED.de talks about...

Image: a diamond on a white background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/shenki
Understanding quantum physics is hard for non-physicists. Yet devices that rely on quantum technology increasingly find their way into industrial production, medicine, and consumer applications. It is no wonder that Germany’s Federal Government also recognizes the need to promote a variety of projects in this field.
Read more in the interview!
Quantum technology transforms industry and technology
All interviews at COMPAMED-tradefair.com
To top

Wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health

Materials & Production

Stanford engineers have developed a way to detect physiological signals emanating from the skin with sensors that stick like band-aids and beam wireless readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing.
read more
To top

3D Interconnection technology for future wearable bioelectronics

Materials & Production

Scientists have developed stretchable metal composites and 3D printed them on soft substrates at room temperature.
read more
To top

Model of health

Innovations

Lehigh University researchers have developed a novel approach to determine when patients with tibial fractures can bear weight.
read more
To top

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs

Innovations

Sacrificial ink-writing technique allows 3D printing of large, vascularized human organ building blocks.
read more
To top

Safe and secure medical device packaging systems

COMPAMED Special

Picture: man with gloves opens a medical package; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Thomas Klee
Medical devices come in all shapes and sizes but have one thing in common: they must safely and securely arrive at their destination. To make sure this is the case, the packaging has to fit the product and assure safe transport and delivery. Possible breakage or damage (of sterile) packaging must be avoided.
Read more in our current Special!
Safe and secure medical device packaging systems
Packaging for medical technology
To top

Biopsies: less invasive and more informative

Laboratory Medicine & Hygiene

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a novel technology that could sensitively and accurately detect and classify cancer cells, as well as determine the disease aggressiveness from the least invasive biopsies.
read more
To top

MRI computing technique can spot scar muscles of heart

Mechanical & Process Engineering

3D MRI computing can measure strain in the heart using image registration method. Traditional method involves giving the patient a dose of gadolinium which can affect the kidney, researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found.
read more
To top

Research: Remora-inspired suction disk

Materials Science

Remora fishes are famed hitchhikers of the marine world, possessing high-powered suction disks on the back of their head for attaching themselves in torpedo-like fashion to larger hosts that can provide food and safety -- from whales and sharks to boats and divers.
read more
To top

Newsletter Service

You like our newsletter? Then please recommend us: Forward this newsletter or the link www.COMPAMED.de/news_abo_2 to your friends and colleagues.

If you have difficulties with your order, please write an e-mail to redaktion@compamed.de.

To top
Legal disclaimer

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz, Stockumer Kirchstr. 61
40474 Düsseldorf, Germany

Phone: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
www.messe-duesseldorf.de
info@messe-duesseldorf.de

County Court Düsseldorf HRB 63

Board of Managing Directors: Werner M. Dornscheidt (Chairman), Wolfram N. Diener, Bernhard Stempfle

Chairman of Supervisory Board: Mayor Thomas Geisel

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH processes your personal data. The data protection regulations of Messe Düsseldorf GmbH hold information in closer detail to this subject and are available under www.messe-duesseldorf.de/privacy. You may at any time object to the processing of your personal data either on the aforementioned website, via e-mail to privacy@messe-duesseldorf.de or via postal mail to Messe Düsseldorf GmbH, VG-R, PF 101006, 40001 Düsseldorf, Germany.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube

Should you no longer wish to receive our newsletter, please click here.