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Sensitive spatula for surgery

Dear Sir or Madam,

I hope that you have made a good start into the year 2020! This year we will be there for you again with exciting topics from the world of medical technology. It all started with an interview that deals with the development of a sensitive spatula, for example in brain surgery. You can find it here.

Enjoy reading!

Simone Ernst
Editorial team COMPAMED-tradefair.com

Content

Interview: Sensitive spatula
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Machine learning shapes microwaves for a computer's eyes

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Engineers from Duke University and the Institut de Physique de Nice in France have developed a new method to identify objects using microwaves that improves accuracy while reducing the associated computing time and power requirements.
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Sensor technology: sensitive spatula protects the brain

COMPAMED.de talks about...

Image: Two men are working with a model of the human skull in the lab; Copyright: WHZ/Helge Gerischer
Brain surgery is arguably the most complex procedure in the operating room as surgeons can quickly cause unintentional damage. The culprit are not just surgical cuts (incisions) a surgeon needs to actively make, but might also be passively used instruments. This includes spatula-like retractors used to manipulate tissue and/or hold it in place.
Read more in the interview!
Sensor technology: sensitive spatula protects the brain
All interviews at COMPAMED-tradefair.com
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A tool to democratize nanopore research

Materials Science

A nanopore is a tiny hole in a thin membrane with a diameter of around a billionth of a meter, or about the width of a single DNA molecule. The potential applications of these nanopores are so diverse - from medicine to information technology (IT) - that they could have a major impact on our daily lives.
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New production method for carbon nanotubes

Materials & Production

A new method of producing carbon nanotubes - tiny molecules with incredible physical properties used in touchscreen displays, 5G networks and flexible electronics - has been given the green light by researchers, meaning work in this crucial field can continue.
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Machine keeps human livers alive

Innovations

Researchers from the University Hospital Zurich, ETH Zurich, Wyss Zurich and the University of Zurich have developed a machine that repairs injured human livers and keeps them alive outside the body for one week. This breakthrough may increase the number of available organs for transplantation saving many lives of patients with severe liver diseases or cancer.
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Ultrafast reaction of superfluid helium triggerd by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses

Innovations

A team headed by Professor Frank Stienkemeier at Freiburg’s Institute of Physics and Dr. Marcel Mudrich, professor at the University of Aarhus in Denmark, has observed the ultrafast reaction of nanodroplets of helium after excitation with extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) using a free-electron laser in real time.
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Robotic trunk support assists those with spinal cord injury

Innovations

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can cause devastating damage, including loss of mobility and sensation. Every year, there are an estimated 17,000 new SCIs in the US alone, a rate higher than in most regions of the world. In addition, the rate of SCIs in people 65-years or older is expected to rise in the US, from 13.0 percent in 2010 to 16.1 percent by 2020.
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AI: identifies unknown features associated with cancer recurrence

Innovations

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology developed by the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP) in Japan has successfully found features in pathology images from human cancer patients, without annotation, that could be understood by human doctors.
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Wearable device for people with swallowing problems

Innovations

A wearable monitoring device to make treatments easier and more affordable for the millions of people with swallowing disorders is about to be released into the market.
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Research: Men are more likely than women to call their science "excellent"

International Markets

Male scientists more likely than female colleagues to use language framing their research findings as "excellent", "novel" and "unique". These are the findings of an analysis led by an international team of researchers at the University of Mannheim, the Harvard Medical School, and Yale University, published Dec. 16 in BMJ.
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