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Copying nature's solutions

Dear Sir or Madam,

Technical devices play a major role in medical technology. We interviewed Dr. Ronny Leuschner from SMT ELEKTRONIK GmbH about how sensors ensure that these devices do not fail. You can read all about his company's solutions on this topic in the interview!

In our special, everything revolves around bionics: How can principles from nature be used to make medical technology better and more efficient? And how can the topic be achieved with a sustainable approach? 3D printing in particular holds great potential in this regard, as it makes production more efficient and allows for completely new approaches. Read all about the current state of bionics in the Special.

We keep providing you with many exciting topics from medical technology!

Kyra Molinari
Editorial team COMPAMED-tradefair.com

Content

Interview: Sensors
Special: Bionics
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Sensor Technology: "We always try to create tailor-made solutions for our customer’s product"

COMPAMED talks about ...

Image: a grey box for scanning sensors ; Copyright: monilog by SMT ELEKTRONIK
At virtual.COMPAMED, Dr. Ronny Leuschner from SMT ELEKTRONIK GmbH gave a presentation to illustrate how unique sensor technology helps prevent medical device failure. We had a conversation with him about the subject.
Read more in the interview!
Sensor Technology: "We always try to create tailor-made solutions for our customer’s product"
All interviews at COMPAMED-tradefair.com
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Bionics: How humans learn from nature

Special

Image: a green leaf with some water drops on it; Copyright: PantherMedia/rclassenlayouts
Many solutions for medical devices come and came from nature! One speaks of bionics when there are already solutions in nature to answer technical questions. It is time to take a closer look at this field.
Bionics: How humans learn from nature
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Wearable device turns the body into a battery

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a new, low-cost wearable device that transforms the human body into a biological battery.
read more
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A metalens for virtual and augmented reality

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

Despite all the advances in consumer technology over the past decades, one component has remained frustratingly stagnant: the optical lens. Unlike electronic devices, which have gotten smaller and more efficient over the years, the design and underlying physics of today's optical lenses haven't changed much in about 3,000 years.
read more
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Dynamic 3D printing process features a light-driven twist

Materials & Production

The speed of light has come to 3D printing. Northwestern University engineers have developed a new method that uses light to improve 3D printing speed and precision while also, in combination with a high-precision robot arm, providing the freedom to move, rotate or dilate each layer as the structure is being built.
read more
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Cell 'bones' mystery solved with supercomputers

Materials & Production

Our cells are filled with 'bones,' in a sense. Thin, flexible protein strands called actin filaments help support and move around the bulk of the cells of eukaryotes, which includes all plants and animals. Always on the go, actin filaments constantly grow, shrink, bind with other things, and branch off when cells move.
read more
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New principle for generating X-rays

Materials & Production

Physicists from Göttingen University develop method in which beams are simultaneously generated and guided by 'sandwich structure'.
read more
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Wearables can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis

Innovations

Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, Mount Sinai researchers report in one of the first studies on the topic. The findings were published in Journal of Medical Internet Research.
read more
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Cardiovascular diseases: New computer model improves therapy

Innovations

Using mathematical image processing, scientists at the BioTechMed-Graz research cooperation have found a way to create digital twins from human hearts. The method opens up completely new possibilities in clinical diagnostics.
read more
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International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Business

February 11 marks the sixth "International Day of Women and Girls in Science" initiated by the United Nations. On the occasion of this day, young women in science of Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces (MPICI) want to increase the visibility of women in natural science.
read more
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