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Smart materials and fabric-based muscles

Dear Sir or Madam,

How smart is smart? Our special focuses on materials and plastics that have this attribute and what makes them so suitable for clinical use.

Exoskeletons are also smart. So far, however, they have been of more interest to paraplegics. Project coordinator Klaus Richter from ITP GmbH explains in our interview: "Fabric-based muscles" how the principle could also work for the fingers or the hand.

Have a nice day!

Anne Hofmann
Editorial team COMPAMED-tradefair.com

PS: If you don't want to miss any of these exciting topics, check out our magazine section on COMPAMED-tradefair.com regularly.

Content

Interview: Fabric-based muscles
Special: Smart materials and plastics
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Plug-and-play: Organ-on-a-chip can be customized to the patient

Laboratory Medicine & Hygiene

Major advance from Columbia Engineering team demonstrates first multi-organ chip made of engineered human tissues linked by vascular flow for improved modeling of systemic diseases like cancer
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Want to 3D print a kidney? Start by thinking small

Laboratory Medicine & Hygiene

Human organ transplants offer a crucial lifeline to people with serious illnesses, but there are too few organs to go around: in the U.S. alone, there are more than 112,000 people currently waiting for transplants.
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Smart materials and plastics in clinical use

Special

Image: a stent clamped in an apparatus and illuminated from above; Copyright: PantherMedia / Alexpunker (YAYMicro)
A wide range of different materials are used in medical technology. Some of them are considered "smart materials". They are given this name because of various properties that are added to them in the manufacturing process. You can find out what these can be in the interviews in our Special in May.
Read more in the special!
Smart materials and plastics in clinical use
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Quantum one-way street in topological insulator nanowires

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

An international group of scientists have demonstrated that nanowires can act like a quantum one-way street for electrons when made of material known as a topological insulator. The discovery opens the pathway for new technological applications of devices and demonstrates a significant step on the road to achieving qubits, which can robustly encode information for a quantum computer.
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Wireless, high-speed, low-power: communications for implantable devices

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology, Materials Science

Implantable bioelectronics are often key in assisting or monitoring the heart, brain, and other vital organs, but they often lack a safe, reliable way of transmitting their data. Now researchers at Columbia Engineering have invented a way to augment implantable bioelectronics with simple, high-speed, low-power wireless data links using ions.
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Blood vessels are guides for stimulating implants

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

An implant little bigger than a grain of rice, put gently in place alongside a strategically placed blood vessel, could replace much bulkier devices that stimulate nerves.
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Fabric-based muscles: hand exoskeleton supports finger movement

COMPAMED talks about ...

Image: a black glove with "thumbs up" in front of a white background; Copyright: PantherMedia / Roman Silantev
Exoskeletons are wearable medical devices that help users walk again if they suffered a spinal cord injury. Researchers now want to apply the same principle on a much smaller scale to assist finger joints. An exoskeleton glove is designed to give operators who no longer have full control over the muscles in their hands a new chance at grabbing a book or a cup.
Read more in the interview!
Hand exoskeleton supports finger movement
All interviews at COMPAMED-tradefair.com
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AI framework discovered new shape memory alloy

Materials Science

Researchers from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University used an Artificial Intelligence Materials Selection framework (AIMS) to discover a new shape memory alloy. The shape memory alloy showed the highest efficiency during operation achieved thus far for nickel-titanium-based materials.
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Alternative process for converting white phosphorus promises more sustainability in the chemical industry

Materials Science

Chemists at the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany) have developed a new, more sustainable process for synthesizing numerous important everyday chemicals from white phosphorus. The new process has the potential to establish innovative, more resource-efficient processes in the chemical industry.
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3D printing with glass: new process enables small and complex components

Materials Science

Because of its outstanding transparency as well as its stability in contact with heat or chemicals, glass is relevant for many high-tech applications. However, conventional processes for shaping glass are often tedious, energy-intensive and quickly reach their limits for small and complicated components.
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Addition to the microdisplay family

Innovations

In addition to an energy-saving design, microdisplays for wearables must also display information in a way that they are sufficiently bright under daylight conditions, at best in colored versions and recognizable with the naked eye. The OLED microdisplay family of the Fraunhofer Institute FEP has now been extended: Microdisplays for ultra-high brightness.
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Rice "metalens" could disrupt vacuum UV market

Mechanical & Process Engineering

Rice University photonics researchers have created a potentially disruptive technology for the ultraviolet optics market.
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Cognitive T-slot sensor concept

Mechanical & Process Engineering

Forming presses are widely used as key elements of industrial production processes. The purchasing costs of these machines can reach double-digit millions, and it takes a great deal of time to set up and adjust precisely as needed. Fraunhofer CCIT knows how cognitive transformation of industrial processes can improve the efficiency of forming machines.
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