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Smart materials and fabric-based muscles

Dear Sir or Madam,

How smart is smart? Our special focuses on materials and plastics that have this attribute and what makes them so suitable for clinical use.

Exoskeletons are also smart. So far, however, they have been of more interest to paraplegics. Project coordinator Klaus Richter from ITP GmbH explains in our interview: "Fabric-based muscles" how the principle could also work for the fingers or the hand.

Have a nice day!

Anne Hofmann
Editorial team COMPAMED-tradefair.com

PS: If you don't want to miss any of these exciting topics, check out our magazine section on COMPAMED-tradefair.com regularly.

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Interview: Fabric-based muscles
Special: Smart materials and plastics
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Smart materials and plastics in clinical use

Special

Image: a stent clamped in an apparatus and illuminated from above; Copyright: PantherMedia / Alexpunker (YAYMicro)
A wide range of different materials are used in medical technology. Some of them are considered "smart materials". They are given this name because of various properties that are added to them in the manufacturing process. You can find out what these can be in the interviews in our Special in May.
Read more in the special!
Smart materials and plastics in clinical use
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Quantum one-way street in topological insulator nanowires

Electrical Engineering & Nanotechnology

An international group of scientists have demonstrated that nanowires can act like a quantum one-way street for electrons when made of material known as a topological insulator. The discovery opens the pathway for new technological applications of devices and demonstrates a significant step on the road to achieving qubits, which can robustly encode information for a quantum computer.
read more
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Fabric-based muscles: hand exoskeleton supports finger movement

COMPAMED talks about ...

Image: a black glove with "thumbs up" in front of a white background; Copyright: PantherMedia / Roman Silantev
Exoskeletons are wearable medical devices that help users walk again if they suffered a spinal cord injury. Researchers now want to apply the same principle on a much smaller scale to assist finger joints. An exoskeleton glove is designed to give operators who no longer have full control over the muscles in their hands a new chance at grabbing a book or a cup.
Read more in the interview!
Hand exoskeleton supports finger movement
All interviews at COMPAMED-tradefair.com
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