Medical technology – printed, molded, lasered -- COMPAMED Trade Fair

Medical technology – printed, molded, lasered

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virtual.COMPAMED HIGH-TECH FORUM by IVAM

Session: Equipment manufacturer meets component manufacturer - 16. November 2020

Session: Printed diagnostics and 3D-printing - 16. November 2020

News from COMPAMED-Magazine

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4D bioengineering materials bend, curve like natural tissue
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed new 4D hydrogels -- 3D materials that have the ability to change shape over time in response to stimuli -- that can morph multiple times in a preprogrammed or on-demand manner in response to external trigger signals.
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Walker breakdown in 3D magnetic nanowires
Physicists from Russia, Chile, Brazil, Spain and the UK have studied how the magnetic properties change in 3D nanowires, promising materials for various magnetic applications, depending on the shape of their cross-section. They more deeply probed into the Walker breakdown phenomenon, on the understanding of which the success of the implementation of the future electronics devices depends.
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Ultrafast electron dynamics in space and time
In textbooks and explanatory videos, they are often depicted as colourful balloons or clouds: electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of electrons in molecules, a bit like fuzzy snapshots. In order to understand the exchange of electrons in chemical reactions, it is not only important to know their spatial distribution but also to be able to trace their motion in time.
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Advances in x-ray imaging can help patients with breast cancer
A new X-ray imaging scanner to help surgeons performing breast tumour removal surgery has been developed by UCL experts.
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New skin patch: hope for wearable and all-in-one health monitor
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time.
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Wearable device turns the body into a battery
Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a new, low-cost wearable device that transforms the human body into a biological battery.
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Optimized technology for microelectronics
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) have advanced the technology of high-speed sintering for optical ceramics (Nd3+:YAG), i.e. active elements generating laser emission in the near-infrared wavelength range (1.06 μm) for cutting the edge microelectronics and medicine.
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Brightening the future of semiconductor-based photocatalytic processes
A collaboration between the Pericàs group with Prof. Timothy Noël and Dr. Paola Riente at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e, The Netherlands), has crystallised in a Nature Communications paper where they provide key insight into the chemical nature of the true photocatalyst involved in the Bi2O3-driven atom-transfer radical addition (ATRA) reaction.
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Breakthrough for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy
Overcoming limitations inherent in other LIBS techniques, plasma-grating-induced breakdown spectroscopy enhances signal intensity by more than three times.
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A metalens for virtual and augmented reality
Despite all the advances in consumer technology over the past decades, one component has remained frustratingly stagnant: the optical lens. Unlike electronic devices, which have gotten smaller and more efficient over the years, the design and underlying physics of today's optical lenses haven't changed much in about 3,000 years.
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Nanosheet-based electronics could be one drop away
Scientists at Japan's Nagoya University and the National Institute for Materials Science have found that a simple one-drop approach is cheaper and faster for tiling functional nanosheets together in a single layer. If the process, described in the journal ACS Nano, can be scaled up, it could advance development of next-generation oxide electronics.
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Atomic-scale nanowires can now be produced at scale
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered a way to make self-assembled nanowires of transition metal chalcogenides at scale using chemical vapor deposition. By changing the substrate where the wires form, they can tune how these wires are arranged, from aligned configurations of atomically thin sheets to random networks of bundles.
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Extremely energy efficient microprocessor developed using superconductors
Researchers from Yokohama National University in Japan have developed a prototype microprocessor using superconductor devices that are about 80 times more energy efficient than the state-of-the-art semiconductor devices found in the microprocessors of today's high-performance computing systems.
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See live cells with 7 times greater sensitivity using new microscopy technique
Experts in optical physics have developed a new way to see inside living cells in greater detail using existing microscopy technology and without needing to add stains or fluorescent dyes.
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A new method for fluorescence microscopy
Scientists develop a fluorescence "lifetime" microscopy technique that uses frequency combs and no mechanical parts to observe dynamic biological phenomena.
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Stevens creates entangled photons 100 times more efficiently than previously possible
Super-fast quantum computers and communication devices could revolutionize countless aspects of our lives – but first, researchers need a fast, efficient source of the entangled pairs of photons such systems use to transmit and manipulate information.
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A new method for the functionalization of graphene
An international research team of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated a novel process to modify the structure and properties of graphene, a one atom thick carbon. This chemical reaction, known as photocycloaddition, modifies the bonds between atoms using ultraviolet light.
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Wireless, ultra-thin and battery-free strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive
A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Assistant Professor Chen Po-Yen, has taken the first step towards improving the safety and precision of industrial robotic arms by developing a new range of nanomaterial strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive when measuring minute movements, compared to existing technology.
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Researchers control multiple wavelengths of light from a single source​
KAIST researchers have synthesized a collection of nanoparticles, known as carbon dots, capable of emitting multiple wavelengths of light from a single particle. Additionally, the team discovered that the dispersion of the carbon dots, or the interparticle distance between each dot, influences the properties of the light the carbon dots emit.
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Stretchable micro-supercapacitors to self-power wearables
A stretchable system that can harvest energy from human breathing and motion for use in wearable health-monitoring devices may be possible, according to an international team of researchers, led by Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in Penn State's Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics.
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Optical sensor mimics human eye
Researchers at Oregon State University are making key advances with a new type of optical sensor that more closely mimics the human eye's ability to perceive changes in its visual field.
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Paper-based electrochemical sensor can detect COVID-19 in less than five minutes
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread across the world, testing remains a key strategy for tracking and containing the virus. Bioengineering graduate student, Maha Alafeef, has co-developed a rapid, ultrasensitive test using a paper-based electrochemical sensor that can detect the presence of the virus in less than five minutes.
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