Hand prostheses: AI makes gripping more intuitive -- COMPAMED Trade Fair
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Image: This image shows symbolically some cells in petri plates in a laboratory.

Advancing immune cell analysis with micro-robots

28.02.2024

A cutting-edge research from the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering and Department of Chemistry unveils a development in immune cell analysis. Scientists have engineered microscopic robots capable of binding to immune cells, offering a novel approach to studying their functions and advancing immunotherapy design.
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Image: Attenuation measurement for a waveguide spiral; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM / Volker Mai

Fraunhofer IZM / Volker Mai

Automatedly measuring optical in-glass waveguides

21.12.2023

Researchers at Fraunhofer IZM have now managed to develop a system that can automatically measure propagation losses in integrated optical waveguides, all part of the research project “Integrated Electro-Photonic Panel Systems” (EPho).
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Image: Biomechanical carbon hand prosthesis for disabled people on the table in the office, another white prosthesis in the background; Copyright: ionadidishvili

ionadidishvili

Hand prostheses: Artificial intelligence makes gripping more intuitive

14.12.2023

A better understanding of muscle activity patterns in the forearm supports a more intuitive and natural control of artificial limbs. This requires a network of 128 sensors and artificial intelligence based techniques.
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A large 3D printer prints oval shapes; Copyright: beta-web GmbH / Messe Düsseldorf

Waste reduction and increased efficiency – Delta ModTech at COMPAMED 2023

14.11.2023

Delta ModTech from the USA offers processing, packaging and coating solutions for a wide range of complex medical, pharmaceutical and consumer products. In an interview at COMPAMED 2023, Design Engineer Mike Schehr talks about the challenges of recent years and announces some news.
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Image: Symbolic image of a micro swimmer; Copyright: MPI-DS / LMP

MPI-DS / LMP

The fuel economy of a microswimmer

19.10.2023

Scientists from the department Living Matter Physics at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) developed a general theorem to calculate the minimal energy required for the propulsion of a microswimmer.
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Image: A prosthetic hand and a human hand almost touch. Based on Michelangelo's

atercorv

The new Center for Bionic Intelligence Tübingen Stuttgart

18.10.2023

Scientists from the University of Stuttgart, the University of Tübingen, the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics are conducting research on intelligent bionic systems that will aid understanding and treatment of certain diseases of the central nervous system.
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Image: Close-up of a sensor bracelet demonstrator; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Fraunhofer IBMT

Bidirectional control of prosthetic hands using ultrasonic sensors

12.10.2023

Researchers at Fraunhofer are working as part of an EU research project to improve control of prosthetic hands down to individual fingers.
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Image: Roll-to-roll vacuum coating system RC300; Copyright: Fraunhofer FEP

Fraunhofer FEP

Roll-to-roll: system traverse for 2D inline process monitoring

05.10.2023

Within the joint project KODOS (funding reference 13N14607), funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, a solution for in-line process monitoring and mapping of process parameters was developed with SURAGUS GmbH at Fraunhofer FEP.
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Image: A glass press in a production room enables the automated production of high-precision optical glass components; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPT

Fraunhofer IPT

Research: automated series production of optics with new glass press

21.09.2023

The Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT in Aachen has expanded its machinery with a new system for the automated molding of high-precision optical glass components.
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Image: dr Margarethe Hauck (right) and Lena Saure, wearing glasses and a white coat, test the hydrogel in the laboratory; Copyright: Julia Siekmann, Uni Kiel

Julia Siekmann, Uni Kiel

Muscles for soft robots inspired by nature

07.09.2023

A research team from the Department of Materials Science at Kiel University (CAU) has now developed a new material based on a hydrogel that functions similarly to a muscle. The soft material can be reduced and enlarged in a controlled manner within a short time and could thus take on motion tasks in soft robotics, for example.
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Image: Close-up of a laser performing metal laser material processing toned in blue; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

What can AI do in laser materials processing?

30.08.2023

Automation and zero-defect production are important trends in machine construction. Artificial intelligence (AI) plays a major role in advancing both of them. Today, it can already detect deviations in process monitoring data and implement quality control in real time. In the future, AI will regulate many more processes and simplify process planning through assistance functions.
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Image: Graphic of a processor on a mainboard on the processor is a brain graphically recorded; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Materials for AI: more brainpower for hardware and software

08.08.2023

Researchers are developing neuromorphic materials to optimize adaptive algorithms for autonomous driving and more. These materials resemble brain structure, enabling faster and more efficient algorithm responses. Supported by Volkswagen Foundation with €1 million, the team aims to apply the approach to hardware.
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Image: A person works on a machine; Copyright: ThisisEngineering RAEng / Unsplash

ThisisEngineering RAEng / Unsplash

Sensors: when the ­machine reports its status

01.08.2023

Even if the central concern of digitally integrated production or Industry 4.0 is networking industrial systems – the individual machine remains a central focus point of optimization. The reasons: Networking requires interfaces that must first be implemented on the individual machine.
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Image: Image: A man wearing VR glasses and an exoskeleton glove sits in front of a laptop; Copyright: seventyfourimages

seventyfourimages

Brain-Computer-Interface: Focus on diamond-based quantum sensors

28.07.2023

In the NeuroQ project, a consortium from research and industry wants to develop sensitive sensors that enable better control of neural exoskeletons and prostheses under everyday conditions. Dr. Jan Jeske from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF told us what role artificial diamonds play in this.
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Image: Biopolyester food packaging; Copyright: MPI-IS

MPI-IS

Sustainability for biodegradable artificial muscles

28.03.2023

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, at Johannes Kepler University and at University of Colorado Boulder developed fully biodegradable, high-performance artificial muscles. Their research project marks another step towards green technology becoming a lasting trend in the field of soft robotics.
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Image: A woman in work clothes and with a headset is standing in front of a demonstrator of a production machine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IDMT / Anika Bödecker

Fraunhofer IDMT / Anika Bödecker

Intuitive machine control using speech recognition

21.02.2023

Fraunhofer researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT in Oldenburg have developed a speech recognition solution for use in industrial manufacturing. The system works reliably even in noisy environments and can be flexibly adapted to the user’s needs.
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Image: Patient testing a brain-computer interface to control an exoskeleton hand; Copyright: AG Klinische Neurotechnologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

AG Klinische Neurotechnologie, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Controlling neural exoskeletons more precisely with diamond sensors

01.02.2023

Brain-computer interfaces are able to restore some mobility to paralyzed people by controlling exoskeletons. However, more complex control signals cannot yet be read from the head surface because conventional sensors are not sensitive enough. A collaboration of Fraunhofer IAF, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, University of Stuttgart and other industrial partners has taken up this challenge.
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